How to grow your club in 11 steps

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Enterprising Coaches can grow sport in a sustainable way

How coaches can become better community partners, communicators,
experience providers and business developers

The vast majority of sports coaches and instructors engage with people from their local community who participate in sport for recreational purposes. These people want to enjoy themselves, have fun, improve their skills and be part of a welcoming social and sporting experience. Yes, if possible, they want to develop their skills, but they want to do so in an engaging way; they don’t want to be put under undue pressure from an over-ambitious and zealous coach.

In many cases, the coach is the main contact for people who come to your club and if the experience and engagement they are being provided with by the coach are not up to scratch they will walk away and they will tell friends and family. Whereas when a coach who speaks people’s language, engages and provides great experiences will develop a strong following across the club and the wider community.

As is says in Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation people take up sport for a variety of reasons, including to meet friends, stay active and have fun. Improving their technical performance is unlikely to be what motivates them, at least initially. And indeed getting better at sport may never be very important to some people. Yet most coaching qualifications at entry level continue to be focused on developing technical skills rather than how to encourage people to take part in sport and play and into their motivations.

If we are to engage a much wider range of people in sport, we need to make the people delivering it more diverse and develop coaches and activators who are truly enterprising.

Great participation coaches must be seen as partners with their community
A coach who engages with community partners from outside his/her club will attract more people and funding. These partners are often schools, housing associations, resident groups, community centres or other, often non-sport, bodies. If they perceive that a coach provides services that attract and retain their clients, the more likely they are to want to refer and fund the coach and the club.

So the coach must be able to understand the outlook and the language of these partners and their clients (s)he wants to engage with. Therefore, if you are ‘just coaching’ without taking the lives of the people you are standing in front of, you are much less likely to retain them.

Many people outside community sport often don’t ‘get it’ when it comes to understanding the benefits that sport can have in terms of improving behaviour, education and health. However, I have personally experienced the huge benefits that engaging with the local community can have for sports coaches, at all levels.

Sport does compete for the resources of the community. Community groups, faith, arts, etc. are also vying for volunteers, goodwill and money – if they are better engaged and involved than you and your club they will be more successful in attracting support and resources.

So coaches must be heavily involved with developing shared value so both the club and the community can contribute directly to the strengthening and development of each other.

Coaches must be great communicators
The coach is there to stimulate the participants and how he or she engages and communicates is vital. People are different. Some are nervous, some are indifferent and some are excitable, etc.

However they all have to be motivated; often in different ways. So a coach must be able to listen with enthusiasm and empathy – and not just to those eager kids at the front, but must also have the patience to have conversations with that shy girl in the back. Otherwise, learning and improvement do not take place and the important feeling of achievement is not happening!

Sports coaches need to communicate effectively with many of different people: players, members, parents, officials and other coaches amongst others. They need to have an outgoing personality and not be afraid to communicate, lead and inspire people. If they are coaching children and young people communicating well with their parents is paramount, in order to maintain their support for their child’s participation.

They need to understand the importance of maintaining the right body language and paralanguage (pitch, tone and volume of voice) in order gain credibility and trust. They need to be responsive, adaptable and flexible and listen to people’s lives.

A coach must provide great experiences – they should be activators
How are you making people feel at your club/centre? What memories do they take home? What do they tell their friends?

People participate sport for different reasons – the 40-year-old club tennis player and the 62-year-old walking football player both realise they will never be competing at the Olympics – but they still want to enjoy their sport. So a great coach must understand that progress and achievement will always mean different things to different people and therefore have a clear understanding of those criteria and deliver accordingly.

This principle also applies to community sports clubs, so when you coach, you really have to conscious of who you are coaching and what you are offering and if that fits in with their needs.

They will always forget what you tell them… …but they will never forget how you make them feel!

Enterprising coaches must improve their business development skills
The mindset and skill to anticipate and meeting clients’ needs in a sustainable way are key for enterprising coaches if they are to create real, long-term value. By having real conversations and becoming engaged with users and other stakeholder coaches can build relationships, develop new services and stay abreast with what’s happening in terms of other providers, trends etc. This will enable the enterprise to grow their enterprise and secure its sustainability.

Enterprising coaches must be digitally literate
As the use of digital media is growing exponentially (16 -24- year-olds are online 30 hours per week) coaches must have strong digital understanding and skills, enabling them to engage with their customers and individualise their programmes.

As coaches will, increasingly, be encouraged to engage with inactive groups they will have to understand and embrace their social media habits

This will also make it easier to be sensitive to participants’ life stages, and cultural and demographic differences.

Conclusion
We must raise the status of the many GREAT participation coaches out there but also accept that there is a huge need for improving the way that many coaches partner with their community and customers, communicate and provide great experiences. Then will we see growth in sports participation.

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How to grow sport, while doing social good

Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England
A conference designed to raise awareness, share ideas and experiences,
encourage a new culture and develop relevant skills
5th July 2016
Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC

Building communities through sport
growing sport working with communities

The Government’s strategy for sport and physical activity moves beyond merely looking at how many people take part. In the future, funding decisions will be made on the basis of the social good that sport and physical activity can deliver, not simply on the number of participants. Success in sport will be defined through five key outcomes:
• physical wellbeing
• mental wellbeing
• individual development
• social and community development
• economic development

It is clear that there is a fundamental mind-set shift from looking at the number of adults playing sport to looking at how sport can contribute to national well-being and the economy. There will also be a focus on those people who do not tend to take part in sport, including women and girls, disabled people, those in lower socio-economic groups and older people.

For many ‘traditional’ sports development professionals this new strategy will require a significant shift in the way they work, and they will have to develop a much-improved ability working with providers of community and commercial sport and physical activities, with a wide range of non-sport partners from health to regeneration and with different levels of government.

There is recognition that sports organisations play an important role in increasing physical activity levels through enabling access to sport. Sport has an incredible power to create social change. It can have a positive impact on people’s lives, it can deliver social outcomes in areas such as health and wellbeing, skills, confidence and it brings communities together.

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

Posted in Grow Sport | Leave a comment

How to grow sport, while doing social good

Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England
A conference designed to raise awareness, share ideas and experiences,
encourage a new culture and develop relevant skills
5th July 2016
Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC

In partnership with

Building communities through sport
growing sport working with communities

The Government’s strategy for sport and physical activity moves beyond merely looking at how many people take part. In the future, funding decisions will be made on the basis of the social good that sport and physical activity can deliver, not simply on the number of participants. Success in sport will be defined through five key outcomes:
• physical wellbeing
• mental wellbeing
• individual development
• social and community development
• economic development

It is clear that there is a fundamental mind-set shift from looking at the number of adults playing sport to looking at how sport can contribute to national well-being and the economy. There will also be a focus on those people who do not tend to take part in sport, including women and girls, disabled people, those in lower socio-economic groups and older people.

For many ‘traditional’ sports development professionals this new strategy will require a significant shift in the way they work, and they will have to develop a much-improved ability working with providers of community and commercial sport and physical activities, with a wide range of non-sport partners from health to regeneration and with different levels of government.

There is recognition that sports organisations play an important role in increasing physical activity levels through enabling access to sport. Sport has an incredible power to create social change. It can have a positive impact on people’s lives, it can deliver social outcomes in areas such as health and wellbeing, skills, confidence and it brings communities together.

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

Posted in Grow Sport | Leave a comment

How to grow sport, while doing social good

Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England
A conference designed to raise awareness, share ideas and experiences,
encourage a new culture and develop relevant skills
5th July 2016
Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC

In partnership with

Building communities through sport
growing sport working with communities

The Government’s strategy for sport and physical activity moves beyond merely looking at how many people take part. In the future, funding decisions will be made on the basis of the social good that sport and physical activity can deliver, not simply on the number of participants. Success in sport will be defined through five key outcomes:
• physical wellbeing
• mental wellbeing
• individual development
• social and community development
• economic development

It is clear that there is a fundamental mind-set shift from looking at the number of adults playing sport to looking at how sport can contribute to national well-being and the economy. There will also be a focus on those people who do not tend to take part in sport, including women and girls, disabled people, those in lower socio-economic groups and older people.

For many ‘traditional’ sports development professionals this new strategy will require a significant shift in the way they work, and they will have to develop a much-improved ability working with providers of community and commercial sport and physical activities, with a wide range of non-sport partners from health to regeneration and with different levels of government.

There is recognition that sports organisations play an important role in increasing physical activity levels through enabling access to sport. Sport has an incredible power to create social change. It can have a positive impact on people’s lives, it can deliver social outcomes in areas such as health and wellbeing, skills, confidence and it brings communities together.

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

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How boxing, martial arts and fitness can help marginalised young people

This is the title of the presentation given by Rebecca Donnelly MBE, Chief Executive Officer, Fight 4 Change Foundation at Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England on 5th July 2016 at Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC.

Fight 4 Change works across London and Kent delivering gang intervention programmes and personal development plans for participants, multi-sports programmes, female only programmes and programme specifically targeting mental wellbeing and physical health. All programmes using sport as a hook for social change and social good.

Fight for Change is also now a National Open College Network accredited centre and design their own course that fit alongside their programmes. These courses help progress young people onto broader outcomes producing active citizens, volunteers, apprenticeships and employment opportunities.

Rebecca’s presentation will cover the journey from setting up the charity in 2009 to run programmes that use boxing as the hook to attract marginalised young men and mentors them to become positive members of society.

Rebecca, with a degree in business from Greenwich University, became at 27 the world under-57kg Thai Boxing champion and was also UK amateur boxing champion. She was awarded an MBE in the 2015 New Year Honours List for services to community sport.

This conference will bring everybody together

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

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From ‘just a gymnastics club’ to community sports enterprise

This is the title of the presentation given by Dave Marshall, Head of Participation, British Gymnastics at Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England on 5th July 2016 at Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC.

An aspiration of British Gymnastics 2013-17 strategic plan is for ‘a gymnastics club to become a hub of the community’. To meet this aspiration gymnastics clubs have been supported to broaden their offer and provide opportunities for new groups including non-traditional gymnastic participants.Infrastructure support has helped clubs to develop robust businesses that provide many benefits to the local community.

Many clubs have started to engage with new types of gymnastics to appeal to wider audiences and delivering non-gymnastics activities that add further value. Clubs have been encouraged to develop links with other community partners that add value to their programme and provide benefits to the community. Clubs often support the delivery of gymnastics in schools and deliver sessions in multiple venues including community and leisure centres that widen access. The number of dedicated gymnastics facilities has nearly doubled in the past 4 years and initiatives such as apprenticeships and leadership programmes are encouraging and supporting young adults to set up new clubs and become business managers.
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David leads on the participation growth strategy for BG that has had significant success supporting a year on year growth in participation in gymnastics clubs and other providers and his remit at BG covers facilities, club and partner development, disabilities and activities.

This conference will bring everybody together

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

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This presentation will focus in on Stoke-on-Trent’s highly successful StreetGames programme. It has become one of the largest and most successful initiatives of its kind creating opportunities for people to take part in sport that also deliver wider personal and social benefits

This is the title of the presentation given by Andrew Heaward, General Manager, Sport and Leisure Service, Stoke-on-Trent City Council at Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England on 5th July 2016 at Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC.

This conference is designed to raise awareness, share ideas and experiences, encourage a new culture and develop relevant skills. It is about Building communities through sport and growing sport working with communities

This presentation will focus in on Stoke-on-Trent’s highly successful StreetGames programme. It has become one of the largest and most successful initiatives of its kind creating opportunities for people to take part in sport that also deliver wider personal and social benefits.

It will cover how this is resourced and sustained and discuss the critical nature of partnership working. It will also include thoughts and advice on how engage young people through volunteering and apprenticeships.

It will also explore how the city’s designation as European City of Sport for 2016 will further enhance and grow the programme, to ensure a lasting legacy of participation in the city.

Andrew Heaward has been at Stoke-on-Trent City Council 16 years and his current position is as General Manager for the Sport and Leisure Service with responsibility for policy and strategy, sports development and community sports facilities.

This conference will bring everybody together

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

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Cricket Scotland wins ICC development award

Cricket Scotland has been awarded US$5,000 of International Cricket Council (ICC) funding after winning an award for its development programme.

The governing body won the Best Overall Cricket Development Programme Award in the ICC Development Programme Annual Awards 2015 due to a number of schemes which have stimulated participation.

Programmes such as ‘Thriving Clubs’, which provides expert support for grassroots cricket clubs, and ‘Cricket Force’ – an initiative launches in conjunction with Jewsons which helps to improve local community facilities – were cited the main factors behind the award win.

Ian Sandbrook, Cricket Scotland head of participation, said the award was “great recognition for our clubs, schools, coaches, volunteers and staff”.

“These awards are very important in identifying individuals and programmes which are helping the game of cricket grown in emerging nations,” added ICC head of global development Tim Anderson.

Svend Elkjaer of Sports Marketing Network said: “It is great working with such a dynamic organisation as Cricket Scotland delivering the Thriving Clubs programme. Innovation and enterprise works”.

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How Bradford’s Police Summer Camps engage with 1200 young people through sport, fun and life skills

This is the title of the presentation given by Chris Cahill, PC, West Yorkshire Police and Nosheen Qamer, Team Leader/Project Manager, Bradford College at Sport for Social Good – the new strategy for sport in England on 5th July 2016 at Britannia Stadium, Stoke City FC.

This conference is designed to raise awareness, share ideas and experiences, encourage a new culture and develop relevant skills. It is about Building communities through sport and growing sport working with communities

Chris Cahill started a ‘Fun Week’ in 2009 which focused on a small area in Bradford with 40 attendees. He joined forces with Nosheen Qamer in 2010 and ‘The Police Summer Camp’ was born; it has developed in to a large, multi-agency operation covering the Bradford District with the capacity to engage with 1200 young people, aged 9-15 years old, over a four week period. The programme consists of Sport, Fun and Life Skills, delivered by the partner agencies with a robust referral system in place to work with youngsters who may be considered ‘at risk’ by the various services involved.

This presentation will cover how this multi-agency approach has helped develop these innovative camps which have also reduced anti-social behaviour and have allowed youngsters aged over 16 to gain valuable work experience and to develop their employability skills.

PC Chris Cahill initially worked as a PCSO for eight years after leaving Bradford College’s Public Services Department, Chris developed the original concept to tackle anti-social behaviour in East Bowling.

Nosheen Qamer has worked at Bradford College for 13 years in a range of roles including Curriculum Team Leader for the Public Services department, Nosheen is currently the Project Manager for Police Camps.

This conference will bring everybody together

Real stories and successes to be told, lessons to be learnt,
ideas and experiences to be shared

Delegates will come from community sports clubs, governing bodies of sport, local authorities, community sports trusts at our professional and semi-pro clubs, informal sports providers, community sports enterprises, community groups and other community sports providers and community organisations.

Sports Marketing Network, 5 Station Terrace, Boroughbridge,
YO51 9BU or email svend@smnuk.com Tel 01423 326 660

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